Vietnam Culture

Gongs are musical instruments made of alloy bronze, sometimes with gold, silver, or black bronze added to their composition. In the Kinh language, the word cong identifies convex gongs and the word chieng refers to the flat ones.
“The sense of the dead is that of the final, ” says a Vietnamese proverb, meaning that funeral ceremonies must be solemnly organized.
Hat van or hat chau van, a traditional folk art which combines singing and dancing, is a religious form of art used for extolling the merits of beneficent deities or deified national heroes.
Kite flying is popular throughout the year in Viet Nam but especially so in summer. People of different ages make kites of many shapes, sizes and materials.
Tuong, also called hat boi in the south, is a stage performance that came about during the Ly-Tran dynasties and that became very popular nationwide during the following centuries.
During Tet, a number of villages in northern and central Vietnam hold cooking contests that may sound simple, but follow strict and complex rules: Cooking in the wind and rain.
According to ancient carvings, the moon-shaped lute appeared in Vietnam in the 11th century. Intended to be played by men, the lute has maintained a very important position in the musical traditions of the Kinh.
Vietnamese modern dance started developing around 1945. It consists of a combination of materials; some from the folk dance period and others from the new era.
Vietnamese music has had a rather long history. Since ancient times, the Vietnamese have had a strong inclination for music.
Festive activities are living museums in which typical cultural values of the nation have been preserved for centuries.
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